Science

News and Articles

Mon09232019

Last update07:19:32 PM GMT

3-D microscopy to aid in cell analysis

  • PDF

Like

(Feb. 17, 2012) — The understanding of diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's is set to take a step forward following groundbreaking technology which will enable cell analysis using automated 3D microscopy.

An initiative between the Griffith's School of Information Communication Technology and the Eskitis Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology, the technology will allow the automated identification, separation and analysis of cells as complex as nerve cells in the brain.

"Scientists and clinicians will be able to superimpose multiple data sets in three dimensions using automated techniques and then conduct detailed analysis of the data in a far improved way from the two dimensional microscopy that is currently available," said Dr Adrian Meedeniya, manager of Griffith's Imaging and Image Analysis Facility.

Microscopy and image acquisition technology has undergone a recent revolution, with modern microscopes generating huge multi-dimensional data sets that can easily fill an entire hard drive. Manually analysing these data-sets is incredibly time consuming and prone to human error and bias.

"One of the main motivations for establishing this collaboration with the School of ICT was to create the technology to efficiently deal with these huge data sets," Dr Meedeniya said.

"We will be able to use this technology to rapidly increase our understanding of the way neuro-degenerative disorders affect nerve cell function in the brain."

Underpinned by neural network algorithms (artificial intelligence), the cutting-edge technology is expected to be widely used in disease research within a matter of a few years.


Story Source:

The above story is reprinted from materials provided by Griffith University.

Note: Materials may be edited for content and length. For further information, please contact the source cited above.


Note: If no author is given, the source is cited instead.

Disclaimer: This article is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of or its staff.